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What are the advantages and disadvantages of legalizing drugs

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Introduction

What are the advantages and disadvantages of legalizing drugs Because of addiction and all the related problems, the law prohibits the sale, purchase and use of drugs. Both the individuals and the society are thus protected. But this law has given rise to a very unhealthy situation. The secret production, sale and consumption of drugs have taken alarming proportion worldwide. Drug related problems have considerably increased. Recently some people, including some important personalities, have suggested that drugs are legalized so as to solve these problems. But the authorities are reticent. In fact, legalization of drugs contains both disadvantages and advantages. One advantage of legalizing drugs is evidently the immediate disappearance of the drug cartels and all forms of drug trafficking. If drugs are legally available - for example on medical prescription for the addicts - the trafficker will lose their trade and the prices will fall. ...read more.

Middle

At present, Aids is spread by the sharing of needles among drugs users. With drugs becoming legally available, this practice will disappear and Aids as well as contagious diseases will be controlled to some extent. A study of social history shows that in many communities, the use of drugs especially from plants - was common. In the East, opium smoking was a social practice. Hashish was widely used in the Near East and Europe, marijuana in North America and coca in Latin America. The North American Indians probably offered to guests, marijuana to smoke as a form of welcome and peace. Such drugs, including tobacco, apart from relieving and softening the mind, are still smoked to relieve physical and mental tension, sometimes as a medicine. ...read more.

Conclusion

Their may be a fast moral degradation shaking the foundation of the society. Young and old people may get addicted and neglect the more serious activity of life. Social and economic stability may be in danger. This is one main factor that makes government and other authorities fear legalization. Also, just as alcoholism and smoking account for a lot of social and personal problems, high mortality and family break down, legalised drugs taking may turn the whole family into drug user. A large part of the family budget will go into such drugs. This may in turn to more family and social problem including child neglect and poverty. Such problems will rival with others like abortion, divorce, violence which plague our modern society. This is a strong disadvantage that it will be difficult to counter. Legalization may lead to a point of no return. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This has the makings of a very good essay but it is a little unbalanced at the moment. The writer has given some good and strong explanations for the legalising of drugs but has not really applied the same work to the disadvantages.

The work could be easily extended if further investigation went into the disadvantages. It would also benefit from some statistics and references.

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Marked by teacher Sam Morran 08/10/2013

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