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The policies of the Federal Government failed to support the civil rights of Native Americans To what extent do you agree with this view of the period from 1865-1992?

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Introduction

?The policies of the Federal Government failed to support the civil rights of Native Americans? To what extent do you agree with this view of the period from 1865-1992? It is apparent that the policies of Federal Government failed to support the civil rights of Native American?s due to a lack of clarity in their policies about what civil rights for Native Americans should be. There is however a similar discrepancy between Native Americans themselves who were also indecisive about what their civil rights mean to them. This proposes that although the paternalistic views of Federal government hindered and failed to support civil rights of Native Americans the Native Americans also played a part in their own lack of self-determination. The 1903 Lone Wolf v Hitchcock case is an example of Federal Government failing to support Native American rights and also displays the government annulling previous legislation made prior to the turn of the century to help Native Americans become American Citizens. ...read more.

Middle

The Dawes Act is however extremely ostensible. The Dawes Act disproves the view by showing Federal Government supporting Native civil rights by being the first major legislation to benefit their role in society. However, ultimately the view is proved correct as the Dawes Act placed many uneducated Natives in debt and many Natives were never fully able to utilize the vote by facing discrimination when attempting to do so. Also seeming to further assimilate Native Americans than support them from gaining civil rights. Ergo, Federal Government did fail to support the civil rights of Native Americans by means of reverting prior legislation to ensure the authority of Federal Government was maintained, hindering Native American liberation. The lack of a united Native force displays that not only the Federal Government failed to support the civil rights for Native Americans, but the Native Americans themselves failed to agree on what civil rights they should pine for as a collective force. ...read more.

Conclusion

An example of this is the passing of the Native American Religious Freedom Act 1978 which gave Native Americans back their tribal way of living. However, Federal Government, despite supporting the Native civil rights struggle in the later part of our period, where essentially fixing the mess they made in failing to support the Native American stuggle for civil rights throughout the majority of our time period. This therefore proves the statement correct by supporting that Federal Government was more of a hindrance than help in ensuring that they power of Federal Government was prioritized over supporting Native civil rights. This selfish attitude proved unsympathetic to Native American?s who also are to blame for hindering their own civil rights. Despite giving greater respect to Native American culture by 1992, Federal Government did still fail to support Native civil rights by hindering them grately throughout the whole time period. ...read more.

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