• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did some Americans oppose the 'New Deal'? Was it only because they were rich?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Uday Chana 11K3 Why did some Americans oppose the 'New Deal'? Was it only because they were rich? There were several reasons why some Americans opposed the 'New Deal' but it wasn't only because these people were rich. Some Americans thought the 'New Deal' did too much but some thought it did too little. Roosevelt's main left wing opposition was Huey Long. Huey Long was a Democrat and he started his political career in 1928 when he became Governor of Louisiana. When the Depression hit Louisiana he spent public money to build hospitals, schools etc. his slogan was, "Every man a king, but no man wears a crown." In Long's speeches, he criticised Roosevelt by saying that Roosevelt's 'New Deal' did too little. Instead Long came up with an alternative to the 'New Deal'. It was known as 'Share Our Wealth'. He said if he were to become President then he would take $3 million from the rich people and then give every family $4000- 5000. Then he would introduce national minimum wage, old age pensions and house for war veterans. ...read more.

Middle

I ruined health. And I put screws on the rich man's wealth." Secondly, the rich also thought that Roosevelt was doing too much because they thought he was taking their money and giving it to the poor. The rich thought that Roosevelt was wasting taxpayers' money. Many of the rich hated Roosevelt because he was taking what they had worked for. Their opinions expressed in magazines read by the rich. "As a social and economic class we, who have lived or tried to live in any part on money saved, are being liquidated." Harpers Magazine 1935 "...members of the so-called upper- class frankly hate Franklin Roosevelt" Time Magazine 1936 The opposition also thought that Roosevelt was doing too much because they thought it was morally wrong to destroy crops when the other Americans were starving. Similarly, they felt it was morally wrong to pay dole money because it encouraged dependency and discouraged the 'rugged individualism' on which the Americans Dream was supposed to be based. Republicans thought that the New Deal was dangerous. ...read more.

Conclusion

Now because of Roosevelt's 'New Deal', the states thought that the Federal Government was trying to take over by making too many laws, laws that were supposed to be made by the states. The campaigners for the 'States Rights' showed anger by objecting to the schemes like the TVA and other alphabet agencies. Some of Roosevelt's oppositions also came from the Supreme Court. In 1935- 36, the nine judges that were appointed for life decided that several of Roosevelt's 'New Deal' laws were illegal and broke the constitution (unconstitutional). This proved that he was trying to do so much that his laws were breaking the constitution. The right wing also said that Roosevelt was doing too much when Eleanor Roosevelt spoke out for the poor and unemployed. They said that she should only remain at her husband's side and not take part in any political affairs, for example make speeches etc. because it was not her job. Critics from the right (not only the rich) opposed the 'New Deal' because they thought it was doing too much. The opposition was therefore quite diverse, with different political opinions and economic interests represented. The rich were prominent and vocal, but they were not really Roosevelt's only opponents. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    The New Deal USA

    4 star(s)

    only 4 million out of the previous 12.5m in need of work and further widened the division between white and black. It can, therefore, be considered an unsuccessful policy. The New Deal is viewed by many historians and various people at the time as a waste in government money and

  2. History essay on the new deal

    Firstly he launched the Wagner act which helped workers by giving them legal rights to join unions. He then introduced the social security act which helped the elderly, disabled and unemployed due to sickness.

  1. To What extent had the New Deal been successful in overcoming the Depression in ...

    into practice which resulted in the rise of pricing and the decrease of consumer consumption. It was also looked upon as relieving the employers rather than the employees. Social groups that were left wing saw the NRA as an implement of the corporate state significant to Italian and German fascism.

  2. How important was the strength of opposition to impact the New Deal in the ...

    New Deal he believed it was a communist conspiracy, yet he too fought for similar polices which I believe worsened his credibility, overall his authority and strength did impact the economy, his significance undoubtedly was there yet lost popularity consequently losing his radio program, but he was too radical to

  1. Roosevelt's New Deal

    and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) of 1933 (provided an insurance of deposits in banks to a maximum of $100,000 per depositor, which meant that if the banks crashed, the government would compensate for the individuals' deposited money). This boosted the public's confidence and bank deposits, which restored the

  2. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) was born on January 30, 1882 in Hyde Park, NY. ...

    It was at this time he told the world "the fate of America cannot be dependent on any one man. The greatness of America is grounded in principles and no on any single personality." He was very convincing and received 472 electoral votes, winning the Presidential election by a landslide.

  1. How successful was Roosevelt in delivering relief, recovery and reform during the New Deal?

    ? aimed to ?create an army of workers demonstrating their employability by actually working on projects? (as defined by Corrington Gill, the programme?s Assistant Administer). In other words, it aimed to restore some degree of certainty in the market and also to increase an amount of employed people to give a push to the economy.

  2. Civil Rights Revision Cards 1945-68

    Influenced by writings of MX (& Che Guevara & Mao Tse-Tung) 3. Ideas based on revolutionary nationalism & self-defence. Black paramilitary uniform. 4. Campaigned for .. self-determination, full employment, decent housing, end to exploitation, exemption from military service, end to police brutality, reparations to black Americans as compensation for slavery, black jury to trial blacks (b)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work