• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

'Restorative Justice' - what's it about?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'Restorative Justice' - what's it about? Our present justice system responds to criminal activity with the question "how do we punish?" A Restorative Justice system asks the question: "how do we restore the well-being of the victim, the offender and the community?" It recognises the needs of the victims, who are at present so often left out altogether, and creates an opportunity for them to confront the offender with the hurt they have caused, in a face to face meeting in a controlled and supportive environment. It puts a human face on the victim for the offender, which can be the first step to understanding, remorse and apology. Their oddly worded aim is to try "to get victims to move towards healing, repentance, forgiveness and restoration". ...read more.

Middle

It goes right to the heart of what we are about - community and justice. What we've got isn't working. Often, the first reaction is to call for tougher sentences, and depending on the circumstances, there can even be calls for re-instating the death penalty. Despite these understandable reactions, there is no evidence that these measures reduce levels of offending, and they do little if anything for the victims of crime. A foreign Prime Minister recently admitted in a statement that despite recent policies of more police, longer sentences, longer non-parole periods, and "tougher" policies, crimes of violence are increasing. More of the same - longer still prison sentences, longer still non-parole periods, seven more prisons built to accommodate the load. Flogging offenders doesn't work either. ...read more.

Conclusion

It can rebuild the family relationships which have gone wrong in the first place. Offenders many a times say it is the hardest thing they have ever had to do. Restorative Justice has been enthusiastically embraced by many "Crime Stopping" bodies worldwide. In fact, so ardent is their belief that restorative justice is practical justice that they have invested lots of money for its implementation in their respective countries. But, even more important, the commitment to the process has produced the very results that are intended. Not only is the victim restored - the central issue in restorative justice - but, in many cases, the offender is reconciled back into the community. Restorative justice is a viable alternative to crime. It changes the emphasis in the justice system from the offender to the victim, from punishment to healing and proves itself not as a retrograde step but a progressive one. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Machinery of Justice section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Machinery of Justice essays

  1. Criminal investigations and the criminal justice system

    in criminal justice agencies by; Promoting research into and analyse the work of Crime and Disorder Act. Promoting race equality issues in the composition of Crime and Disorder Act partnership. Tackling youth race issues within the criminal justice through the work of youth offending teams, Widening the race and crime

  2. I will look at different black theologies and different theories of justice, and attempt ...

    Rawls himself says: "The combination of mutual disinterest and the veil of ignorance achieves the same purpose as benevolence. For this combination of conditions forces each person in the original position to take the good of others into account."2 A social contract can now be established, bearing in mind these a priori assumptions, which is built upon two principles.

  1. "Examine why sexual offenders attract so much attention these days. How has the Criminal ...

    that have been elevated to position of 'modern folk devil' (Cohen, 1972). Much of this attention has been stimulated by our sensationalist media, and the increased reporting of s*x crime which has not only increased visibility, but has created a public fascination with s*x crime.

  2. What Impact will Formalising Plea Bargaining have on Justice and Equality in the English ...

    The defendant later appealed on the ground that he did not have an open choice in withdrawing his initial plea. The appeal was allowed on the basis that the accused may have understood that the opinions put across were those of the trial judge and therefore may have been deprived of his self-determination of plea.

  1. The Canadian Justice system towards aboriginal offenders

    By referring to the victimized entity as 'her majesty' and the prosecuting lawyer as 'the Crown', the justice system legally accentuates that responsibility for crime has been taken over by the state.5 The implications of removing the victim from the process are numerous for the aboriginal offender, whose cultural values

  2. Custodial Sentences.

    the offender will serve the sentence together with any sentence for the new offence. 2. COMMUNITY SENTENCES * Community Rehabilitation Orders This places the offender under the supervision of a probation officer for a period of between six months and three years.

  1. Expert Testimony and Its Value In the Justice System

    A possible way of implementing this would be to have the potential expert witness first pass an objective test with some small stipulations before being approved by a Judge or Magistrate. The Evidence Once an individual has been deemed fit to testify it is the evidence that they provide which next comes under scrutiny.

  2. Arguing in Favour of the Death Penalty

    Opponents of the death penalty call for reform so that the death penalty can be done away with altogether and think that the criminals should all just be put into jail for life without parole. People fail to realize that the prisons are full and it costs millions of dollars

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work