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Fermentation of different sugars by yeast.

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Introduction

Fermentation of Different Sugars by Yeast Aim In this experiment I am going to investigate the fermentation of different sugars by yeast. To do this I am going to change the sugars and see how different sugars ferment with yeast. Hypothesis My Hypothesis is that the sugars will ferment the quickest in this or from fastest to slowest; Glucose, Fructose, Maltose, Sucrose and Lactose. This is due to the fact that Glucose and Fructose are monosaccharides, therefore they will be easier to breakdown. I think that Glucose will be faster than Fructose as its arrangement will make it slightly easier to breakdown. Lactose will be last, as Galactose which is one of the monosaccharides that makes Lactose, is going to be hard to breakdown. Equipment 20cm3 yeast suspension 10 cm3 0.1M glucose solution 10 cm3 0.1M fructose solution 10 cm3 0.1M sucrose solution 10 cm3 0.1M lactose solution 10 cm3 0.1M maltose solution 5 x 5cm3 plastic syringes 5 x 25cm length of capillary tubing Rubber tubing Ruler Stick Tape Glass Marking Pen Stop watch Set up Preliminary Work Respiration in yeast and the effect of temperature In this experiment we looked at how temperature effects yeast. ...read more.

Middle

If gas is produced from the fermentation an equivalent amount liquid will be displaced from the barrel into a capillary tube. By measuring the amount of liquid displaced after frequent intervals over a period of 30 minutes, it will be possible to determine the rate at which fermentation takes place. If we repeat the method for different sugars we will be able to work out how fermentation differs from sugar to sugar. For my actual experiment for this experiment I will use a similar method to the one above, but try and keep the temperature at 37c by using a water bath, if possible. Scientific Knowledge The sugars that I will use in this experiment are: * Glucose * Fructose * Sucrose * Lactose * Maltose Glucose and Fructose are both monosaccharides, which means that they exist as single molecules. They are very similar; in fact they both have the same chemical formula, C6H12O6. The only difference is that they are arranged slightly differently. The other sugars, that are going to be used, are all disaccharide, which means that they are two monosaccharide sugar molecules joined together by a glycosidic bond. ...read more.

Conclusion

Start the stopwatch. 7. At intervals of 1 minute, record the amount of liquid displaced for the next 20 minutes. 8. Repeat steps 2-7 with fructose solution instead of glucose. 9. Repeat steps 2-7 with sucrose solution instead of glucose. 10. Repeat steps 2-7 with lactose solution instead of glucose. 11. Repeat steps 2-7 with maltose solution instead of glucose. 12. Now repeat the whole experiment, so that the results are reliable. 13. Fill in the table. Reliability of Method To make sure that our experiment would be reliable we took a number of precautions. First of all we decided that we would repeat the experiment for all of the different sugars. Also we decided to take a large number of recordings at short intervals, 1 minute. The measurements should be accurate due to the fact that we will look at the meniscus at eye level. Stirring the yeast will also increase the reliability. Risk Assessment General good laboratory practice should be sufficient We should also wash hands after the experiment. A lot of the equipment is made with glass, so they will also have to be handled with care. All stools must be tucked in so that people won't trip over them. ...read more.

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