• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Humans and the Galapogas Islands

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

HUMANS AND THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS The Galapagos Archipelago is located on both sides of the equatorial line approximately 970 km (600 miles) west from continental Ecuador. Local time is -6 GMT. It is formed by thirteen greater islands, six smaller islands, 42 islets and several rocks, which cover a total area of 7,850 km². The largest island is Isabela, with a total area of 4,590 km² which presents the highest point of the archipelago, volcano Wolf, 1,690 meters. 97% of the total area of the isles belongs to the Galapagos National Park, the rest belongs to inhabited and developed areas. Delicate ecosystems are continually threatened by population pressures, tourism, introduced species, poaching and illegal fishing. Several animal species native to the Galapagos Islands are gradually disappearing as direct result of fishing and collecting. Illegal poaching of rare or even endangered species and the harvesting of several prized marine species are both on the rise, as international demand for local products such as sea cucumbers and shark fins has grown. ...read more.

Middle

The impact of alien mammals was illustrated by goats on the Island of Santiago. Some initially released in 1833 probably died out, but a further release of goats and some pigs in 1917 were so successful that by the 1970s up to 100,000 goats were roaming the island. They devastated the flora while at the same time allowing two alien herbs, which the goats do not like, to flourish. In 1972 there was still some wooded vegetation but by 2003 there was mainly grassland. A programme to eradicate all the goats and pigs on Santiago and Northern Isabela was undertaken and completed by 2006. On Pinta Island where one male and two female goats were introduced in 1959, by 1974 there were about 30,000 of them. These were eradicated and resulted in the start of such tremendous plant growth that it is now considered that some balance needs to be reached by an herbivorous species. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Foundation is part of a network of local and national organizations supporting Galapagos Island protection. For fifty years, CDF has worked closely with the Galapagos National Park Service (GNPS), the main government authority overseeing the safeguarding of the islands? natural resources, providing the results of scientific research to conserve this living laboratory. CDF?s mission is to provide knowledge and assistance through scientific research and complementary action to ensure the conservation of the environment and biodiversity in the Galapagos Archipelago. Within this context, the vision of the CDF for 2016 is to be the world's leading research institution dedicated to the conservation of the biological diversity and natural resources of Galapagos, and committed to building a sustainable and collaborative society to achieve this objective. The Galapagos Marine Reserve was established in 1998. Created as a "Protected Area", designed to protect the waters surrounding the Galapagos Islands and the resources they contain. The waters surrounding the Galapagos are home to 3000 species of marine plants and animals. The designation of the Galapagos Marine Reserve recognizes the principles of conservation, and creates the legal basis for such special treatment. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Genetics, Evolution & Biodiversity section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Genetics, Evolution & Biodiversity essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Epping Forest Coursework

    4 star(s)

    The greater the soil moisture, the more water there is available to the bracken. As a result, the plant can photosynthesise more and produce more food. Due to this, the height of bracken would increase. pH is another factor. Therefore I will need to select areas do not vary in pH.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Problem - Maintaining the habitat of the capybara and breeding them for meat.

    4 star(s)

    3. The harvest quotas are established on the basis of population sizes on each farm, determined by officials of the Ministry of the Environment. 4. A harvest rate of about 30% is applicable, which experience since 1968 has shown will maintain a fairly stationary population. 5.

  1. Peer reviewed

    Is there a relationship between the girth of a tree trunk and the percentage ...

    4 star(s)

    32 48.75 73 15 0.949 36 31 34 19 30.00 11 16 0.726 31 26 35 21 28.25 825 17 0.881 39 42 31 16 32.00 246 18 1.837 74 52 46 46 54.50 193 19 1.681 69 44 52 11

  2. Free essay

    Outline the impact on the evolution of plants and animals of: ...

    Mutagens can be carcinogens (cancer causing) or teratogens (birth defects causing). Effect of radiation on DNA strands: * E.g. UV light, X-rays, radioactive materials, chemicals. * Can cause bases to be deleted, totally removed from strand * Can cause thymine bases to link together * This causes a disruption in the normal functions of DNA *

  1. HSC maintaining a balance notes

    These survivors who possess the desirable characteristics or adaptations breed and reproduced offspring who will also be resistant to DDT sprays. 4. V) DNA James Watson - with Crick suggested the double helix structure and pairing of bases; pointing out its significance as a copying mechanism for genetic material.

  2. Free essay

    Darwin's Finches

    On Isla Wolf the Sharp Beaked Ground Finch is known as the "Vampire Finch" as it jumps on the backs of Masked Boobies and Red-Footed Boobies pecking at their flesh and feeding on their blood.

  1. Investigating the colour variation of Littorina littoralis and their abundance across the upper, middle ...

    The ratio of these were 1 : 2.8 : 12 of upper : middle : lower. The orange-shelled Littorina littoralis did not match the pattern of all the other shell colours. Whereas other colours decreased as they got closer to the land-side of the shore, orange-shelled Littorina littoralis actually increased in abundance.

  2. Colour variation in Littorina littoralis on the upper, middle and lower zones of a ...

    The same collecting tray will be used throughout the investigation Observer Colours may be perceived differently by different people. I will be the only person collecting data for this investigation Sampling effort As I get more and more used to the method, it would be possible to pay less attention

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work