• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and Contrast 'Atlas' and 'Valentine'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and Contrast "Valentine" and "Atlas" Both "Valentine" and "Atlas" transcend the "red rose or...satin heart", in their exploration of love. They discuss love from different angles, portraying a different opinion of the place that love takes in life. They both use extended metaphors to express their views of love, choosing unexpected objects as the subjects of their metaphors. Duffy uses an onion, which generally implies tears, stinging, and is thought of with negative connotations. This is in contrast to love, because this is regarded as a positive thing, which makes people happy, rather than "blind[ing them] with grief". However, upon consideration, this comparison appears to be appropriate. It offers a realistic view of love, acknowledging the faults and lies in the usual depiction of love. It states the importance of understanding the dangers that come with love, and the long lasting effect it can have upon a person, even after the relationship has broken, as it "clings to [their] fingers". It is evident that Duffy realises the multi-faceted nature of love. As although love "promises light", it can also be "Lethal". ...read more.

Middle

In Fanthorpe's view of love, it is essential to "uphold/ The permanent elaborate/ Structures of living". It is given immense importance by the classical comparison of her "suspect edifice" being kept "upright...As Atlas did the sky". However, this differs from Duffy, who portrays love as a choice, "if you like". Although it is a choice, once made, it is inescapable as it will "cling" to you and "stay on your lips". It is clear that Duffy is aware of the transience of love, as she states "for as long as we are". Therefore, although a relationship can end, the love once felt has an interminable hold. Both poets have a disillusioned view of love, and are "trying to be truthful". However, the truths they are trying to reveal are of very different kinds. "Valentine" exposes that fact that there is much more to love can be first ascertained. There is a hidden, destructive force that comes with the "cute card or a kissogram", which turns you into "a wobbling photo of grief". This is done by the first verse making love seem to be really good[SS3], and then suddenly adding a negative tone in the second stanza. ...read more.

Conclusion

The complete separation of "I am trying to be truthful" adds a feeling of desperation. This differs greatly form "Atlas". Although the start of "Atlas" is split into couplets, there is a feeling of continuity throughout the poem. This is achieved through enjambment, even between different stanzas, "which upholds/ The permanently, ricketty". The enjambment makes the poem seem less jerky and harsh. "Atlas" is written mostly in pairs of lines; however, the addition of "As Atlas did the sky" causes the last section to have an uneven number of lines. This adds impact on that line and on the subject of her metaphor. Both of these poem look below the surface of love, trying to see what is "wrapped in brown paper". However, what they find upon their "undressing of love" differs greatly. After reading "Valentine", the reader is left with a rather cynical, yet realistic view of love, and all the potential dangers it brings. "Atlas", on the other hand, portrays love as an essential part of life, even if it has a "sensible side" which is not so palatable. Therefore, although both these poets are being "truthful", they are exposing two very different truths. [SS1]2nd [SS2]3rd [SS3]uummm ?? ?? ?? ?? 24/01/06 to 15/07/2008 PAGE 1 of 2 SHIVANI SINGHAL ENGLISH COURSEWORK MR. FORBES ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparisons section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparisons essays

  1. never offer your heart to someone who eats hearts and the Lie

    In this stanza the writer talks about "freezing" your heart, when you freeze your heart, no one can get to it. Words associated with cooking and recipes are used in this poem such as "rare", "delicious" and "stewed". This makes the reader want to follow the instructions correctly in order to achieve the intended results, like in a recipe.

  2. How does H.G. Wells create fear and tension for the reader in the Victorian ...

    Wells used this to show that during daylight, the place is full of life but when the night comes, the place turns wield. The author wants to build up the tension near the start and slowly come back down at the end to make the reader think back of the story.

  1. Compare and contrast how Seamus Heaney and Carol Ann Duffy have described the ending ...

    are described very different in each poem because in Heaney's poem the frogs are made out to be scary, 'Angry frogs' Whereas in Duffy's poem they just sound like innocent little creatures, 'Jumping and croaking away from the lunch queue.'

  2. Compare and contrast A Wife in London(TM) w

    What is more, there is a narrator, similarly to 'AWIL'. A similarity between the poems is that they both involve a letter. In both poems it seems that the letter is being read in the voice of whoever wrote it.

  1. Compare and contrast The Flea(TM) by John Donne and To His Coy Mistress(TM) by ...

    It is a very odd for a love poem to sound and be as direct as this, being very forceful and putting pressure on her for her to say yes. The way he puts forward his argument is very simple but very clever and powerful at the same time.

  2. Seamus Heaney : Comparisons

    The last line is also shows like at the beginning Seamus Heaney's relationship with the windeby girl as it says 'My poor scapegoat'. However the next stanza takes a different approach rather than beauty, as it carries on the idea of the relationship between Seamus Heaney and the windeby girl

  1. How love affects the poets in Valentine and Funeral Blues.

    In the third stanza, Duffy moves onto the negative side of love. As love progresses ?it will blind you with tears? here, the poet uses the tears caused by cutting an onion to illustrate how the excitement of love causes a person to focus on nothing but their lover, overlooking the rest of the world around them.

  2. Alice Walker (Poem at Thirty-Nine), U. A. Fanthorpe (Half past Two) and D. H. ...

    It was as if he was falling into a trance of his regular daily life and this hypnotic stanza was achieved by the repetition of ?Into? and we also see oxymoron where Fanthorpe says ??silent noise his hangnail made.? Then we see where he snaps out of the trance, it

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work