(a)(iii) Explain the significance of cow protection and vegetarianism in Hinduism

(a)(iii) Explain the significance of cow protection and vegetarianism in Hinduism Cow protection and vegetarianism are significant beliefs and values within Hinduism, as there are many teachings on these two topics. Cow protection is mentioned in the early Hindu scriptures the Vedas. Within these four books are references to herds of cattle, and the cow was a sacrificial animal, being appreciated for its role as an offering to the Gods. So cows were used as a sacrifice and the person offering the sacrifice could gain ascension to heaven, especially if numerous sacrifices were offered. Therefore the cow is regarded sacred because from a religious perspective it was used in ritual sacrifice. In ancient Hindu society a Brahmin had a special role as he understood the Vedas and maintained order in the world by performing sacrifices. Therefore people thought it was important to respect the Brahmin and his cow. The cow was also valued economically as it made many essential products. It is the source of milk, milk products, meat, dung etc. The products of butter, whey, cream and cheese made up a ritual offering named ida. The cow was also a great prize of war. Even cows' urine has medicinal qualities as it can be used to cure ailments. The state of Gujarat in India encourages sufferers of ailments to drink the urine and doctors prescribe it. Shiva's vehicle is Nandi the bull

  • Word count: 1109
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Compare and contrast the iconography and mythology of at least two major Hindu deities.

Compare and contrast the iconography and mythology of at least two major Hindu deities. In Hindu tradition, Brahma created the universe, Vishnu maintained it and Shiva destroyed it. These three gods comprise the Hindu trinity (the trimurti) and are considered to be the leading gods of the religion, especially Brahma, who is the oldest of all the gods. This point is questionable though as the Visnu Purana talks of Brahma emerging from Vishnu's navel to maintain the world after Vishnu has created it and then he returns to the navel after Shiva has destroyed it. If this is the case then Vishnu's position as a god is elevated from merely the maintainer to the creator. This essay intends to compare and contrast the iconography and mythology of the two major Hindu deities Vishnu and Shiva with reference to their relationship with Brahma as part of the Hindu trinity. The Hindu god Vishnu is very powerful to his followers, the Vaishnavas, and he is found as an icon in many temples although he is also believed to dwell in the heart of all beings. Vishnu is said to be young compared to the other gods and blue in colour. He is depicted as having four hands holding a lotus, symbolising purity, mace, a conch shell to blow and a discus as a weapon. Vishnu is married to the goddesses Sri and Laksmi who were initially individuals but eventually merged into one being. Vishnu has a curl of

  • Word count: 2126
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Describe Hindu belief in respect for all living creatures.

RS GCSE Coursework Hinduism (a)(i) Describe Hindu belief in respect for all living creatures. In the Hindu scripts, Hindus strongly believe that all living forms should be respected they also believe in the sacredness of all life, whether in animal, plant or human kind. The reasons for these beliefs are that Hindus believe that Brahman, the universal spirit is present everywhere in the universe, therefore it is considered to be highly respected. The Upanishads contain these teachings, "His being is the source of all beings, the seed of all things are in this life have their life. He is God hidden in all beings, their inmost soul. He lives in all things and watches all things." This is taken from the Svetasvatara Upanishad teaching respect for all life. According to Hindus, both living and non-living objects, (eg - mountains), was put there for a reason, by God. They also believe that all human beings need one and other to live, and it is all a chain. In the Bhagavad Gita it quotes, "Thus joy supreme comes to the yogi whose heart is still, whose passions are peace, who is pure from sin, who is one with Brahman with God...He who sees the oneness of love, loves me in whatever he sees. Wherever this man may live, in truth this man lives in me." Since Hindus believe in samsara (the cycle of life and death), they believe that in some way, everyone is related to

  • Word count: 2664
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Hinduism - When a Hindu does dies.

Hinduism When a Hindu dies, it is believed that they should, if possible, have the name of God on their lips, as this is supposed to bring them closer to God. Every true Hindu, would like to die in Benares, the holiest of all holy places. It is believed that Moksha will come to those who are fortunate to die there. If it is not possible to die in Benares, a Hindu wishes to die near the River Ganges, because a Hindu believes that the sacred waters of the Ganges washes away the Karma that binds the sol to earthly existence, and so, Moksha may come to them more easily. When a Hindu does die, their lips are touched with water containing leaves from the sacred Tulsi plant. This cleanses the lips of the dead, which helps to wash away bad karma that prevents the soul from achieving moksha. At the point of death, the Hindu's family is able to mourn, however, they mustn't show too much emotion, as this disturbs the spirit. (I think that this teaching is good, because it helps the mourners to stop mourning ~ because not mourning, is the best thing for the dead Hindu's soul. This gives a reason for the relatives to stop mourning, and start coping with their loss.) In India, the dead Hindu's funeral must be within a day, wherever possible, and in England, it should be within three days. Because fire is very important in Hinduism, it is not very much of a surprise that a Hindu is

  • Word count: 837
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

The Hindu marriage ceremony consists of several steps.

The Hindu marriage ceremony consists of several steps. The following is a description of this colorful and unique ceremony. This is a generalized wedding ceremony, and there are regional and community variations. Some of the steps may be omited or added from the following list based on local and family customs. The main three are- Pre marriage- Mahendi and Peethi The marriage ceremony (wedding) Post marriage ceremonies A day before the wedding the palm and feet of the bride are decorated with "Mahendi". A canopy or mandapa decorated with flowers is erected at the place of wedding. On the wedding morning, various ablutionary rituals are performed on both the bride and the groom in their own homes. Their bodies are anointed with turmeric, sandalwood paste and oils, which cleanse the body, soften the skin, and make it aromatic. They are then bathed to the chanting of Vedic mantras. The bride and the bridegroom face each other, and the priest ties their garments (the bride's saree to the groom's shirt) in a knot, symbolizing the sacred union. The bride and the bridegroom garland each other and exchange the rings. Next the nuptial fire, symbolizing the divine witness, and the sanctifier of the sacrament, is installed and worshipped. Both the bride and the groom grasp their hands together and pray to God for His blessings. Samagree, consisting of crushed sandalwood,

  • Word count: 347
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Body Ritual Among the Nacirema

Body Ritual Among the Nacirema Horace Miner What is the precise geographical location of this strange tribe, the Nacirema? The Nacirema is a North American group living in the territory between the Canadian Cree, the Yaqui and Tarahumare of Mexico, and the Carib and Arawak of the Antilles. Little is known of their origin, though tradition states that they came from the east. What are the private and secret shrines of the Nacirema? In the Nacirema, the belief is that the human body is ugly and that its natural tendency is to debility and disease. Every household has one or more shrines devoted to the hope that mans body will be changed through the use of the powerful influences of ritual and ceremony. Each family has at least on such shrine; the rituals associated with it are not family ceremonies but are private and secret. The rites are normally only discussed with children, and then only during the period when they are being initiated into these mysteries. The focal point of the shrine is a box or chest which is built into the wall. Many charms and magical potions without which no native believes he could live. These preparations are secured from a variety of specialized practitioners. The most powerful of these are the medicine men, whose assistance must be rewarded with substantial gifts. Who are the Nacirema's holy-mouth-men? In the hierarchy of

  • Word count: 715
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Analyze and Explain the Role and Function of the leaders in the Mandir

a) ii) Analyze and Explain the Role and Function of the leaders in the Mandir The leader of a mandir is usually the priest, who is always a man and preferably a Brahmin. His job is to look after the murtis, to continue the Hindu traditions, and lead worshippers in special pujas, ceremonies, and the reading of Sanskrit scriptures. The Hindu priest is the leader of his local Hindu community, leading them in the path to achieve moksha. One of the key duties of the priest is to look after the deities that live in the mandir. The deity is treated as the resident royalty of the temple and is looked upon as a true person, not just a statue or picture. As a real person, the deity must eat, sleep, change clothes and wash. The murti cannot do this, so the priest must do all of this for the murti. Every morning the priest will put fresh, nice clothes on the deity, and decorate the murtis and its shrine with fresh garlands of flowers. He will also wash the statue of the God with a bit of water, and then he will perform morning puja. The priest will also set resting times for the deity throughout the day, not allowing people in to worship at certain times of the day. Because of the long working hours of Hong Kong, many people find it hard to find time to enjoy life and have fun. There is no time for socialising and friends anymore. This brings up stress, pressure, and depression. Kama

  • Word count: 699
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Ancient Greek Medical Association Guide to the Asklepion Temples One of the best Asklepion Temples around is the one at Epidaurus.

Ancient Greek Medical Association Guide to the Asklepion Temples One of the best Asklepion Temples around is the one at Epidaurus. It is in a quiet, secluded part of Greece and is perfect for anyone seeking spiritual and physical healing. I will now say that this superb Asklepion is strictly reserved for the middle to upper class citizens because it is out of the price range of those in the lower classes. Here at Epidaurus, we have a superb range of facilities for you to use. We have use of: * Sunk-in Stadium * Large gymnasium * Cleansing Baths * Temple of Artemus * Temple of Asklepius * Abaton-where patients sleep at night and are visited by Asklepius and his daughters, Panacea and Hygeia. Here at the Epidaurus Asklepion many things can happen to you. You can have your mind and souls cleansed at one of our specialized Temples which are the Temples of Artemus and Asklepius. Also your body must not lose out as we have heated baths and the largest gymnasium in all of Greece, where our highly trained instructors who will help guide you through a tough traditional course from the surrounding cultures. The Abaton here is also one of the best in the country. It has had the most healings from Asklepion and his daughters for the last four years! That's quite a record! If you have not already heard about the Asklepion here at Epidaurus you must have been building a

  • Word count: 269
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Cow protection and vegetarianism.

Cow protection and vegetarianism In the Vedas, the earliest of Hindu scriptures, there is a reference to animals being an important part in religious ceremony. There are also references of cows in the hymns. The cow was a sacrificial animal which was appreciated for its role in offerings to the gods. Hindus believed that the person, who offers a cow, would gain immediate ascension to heaven, so the cow must be holy and important. Around the time the Vedas were written cows were regarded as a great prize. It had a high value and was the source of many useful products such as milk, cheese and meat. It was also thought to protect Brahman. Ahimsa however was only introduced around the 6th Centaury BCE, by Mahavira the Jain. It gradually increased in popularity amongst Hindus. Nowadays one could say the cow is like a domestic animal in India. They are permitted to roam freely around the streets and they are cared for in temples. A westerner would never think of eating his dog or cat, so a Hindu would never dream of eating a cow. In villages in India, the cow nurtures and sustains life. Its milk provides essential food; its manure provides fuel, heat and light in the home. The cow's urine is alleged to have special healing properties and is available as a cream or liquid. Gandhi said that the cow was a symbol of Hinduism. As most Hindus are vegetarian, they believe in total

  • Word count: 800
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Creative writing- emotions and feelings- new experiences

Creative writing- emotions and feelings- new experiences As I walked out, the subtle, humid breeze swept past me, I looked around, it was like I had stepped into a different world. England was very different. The palm trees blew almost by their own accord and oranges and reds lined the horizon. The ruffling sound of plane engines getting ready to take off could be heard in the distance. It was late night, but even in the absence of he sun in the sky, it was around 30C. We were led around to the adjacent side where we all crowded into a bus. The atmosphere was very lively; people were talking excitedly and hurriedly, as if once we got off the bus they wouldn't be able to say anymore. I wasn't very anxious at all to see any of the places. We would go and see old buildings and places that tourists visit every year. The only feeling I felt was tiredness. I have never really been interested in history. I don't get fascinated very easily, I didn't expect anything special. We came upon our group rep. He was an average sized man, no more than 5 foot 8. He was wearing long brown shorts with a matching brown shirt and a ranger hat that shadowed his upper face so his eyes were hidden. His hair was a murky black colour and fell, rather untidily to his shoulders. He was rather uncanny to say the least We were told that it would be a 15-minute journey to the Ship. It was followed by a

  • Word count: 1319
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay