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Many criticisms of the Hoyt Sector Model are similar to those of the Burgess Model, although it should be considered that the model was put forward before the redevelopment of inner-city areas and the rapid growth of the car-based suburb.

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Introduction

URBAN MORPHOLOGY * As cities have grown in area and population in the 20th century, many geographers have tried to identify and to explain variations in spatial patterns. Spatial patterns, which show differences and similarities in land use and/or social groupings within a city, reflect how various urban areas have evolved economically and culturally in response to changing conditions over a period of time. While each city has its own distinctive pattern, studies of other urban areas have shown that they also demonstrate similar patterns. Consequently, several models describing and explaining urban structure have been put forward. * The two urban models below are the typical structures of many towns and cities in MEDCs. Burgess Model; * This is a very simple urban model, based upon the American city of Chicago using the geographical theory that as the town or city grows, newer buildings are constructed further away from the CBD. ...read more.

Middle

Central Business District; The CBD contains the major shops, offices and administration outlets; it is the centre of commerce, business and entertainment as well as being the focal point for transport routes. o 2. Factories/Industry; Industry developed in the UK in the nineteenth century, and factories were built around the CBD. Housing, often terraced in cramp and overcrowded conditions, was constructed for workers to live in and was situated close to the factories. o 3. Working Class Housing; Areas of low-class housing, occupied by those who moved away from Zone Two, due to developed transport links that allowed them to commute to the factories and industrial outlets (where they work). o 4. Middle Class Housing; Medium-class housing of higher quality, may include inter-war, semi-detached houses and council estates. ...read more.

Conclusion

o The affluent could also afford the highest rates so therefore chose the 'best sites' - competition based upon the ability to pay solved many land use conflicts. o Land uses attracted similar land uses, thus concentrating a function in a particular area, this lead to the idea of sector development. * Hoyt suggested that the areas of highest value were concentrated along the main lines of communication, causing the city to develop in a series of wedges. Additionally, he claimed that once an area developed with a distinctive land use it tended to retain that function as the city grew outwards. * Many criticisms of the Hoyt Sector Model are similar to those of the Burgess Model, although it should be considered that the model was put forward before the redevelopment of inner-city areas and the rapid growth of the car-based suburb. ...read more.

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