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Why had Henry failed to achieve his aimsin foreign policy by 1529? Henry's aims since he came to the throne in1509 was glory, he thought he could get this through

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Introduction

Why had Henry failed to achieve his aims in foreign policy by 1529? Henry's aims since he came to the throne in1509 was glory, he thought he could get this through vast amount of money. Henry at the time was almost broke and therefore needed "glory" quickly, and the way Henry came up with to make money and gain glory was via war. He needed to attack France but he had no money, Wolsey raised the funds and so became very close to Henry and he went on to gain "glory". Although Henry was satisfied with the war he still wanted more glory and to be a dominant figure in Europe. Unfortunately Henry had not achieved his aims by 1529, this was due to a number of reasons, one being that the other powers in Europe were much bigger and grew faster than Henry so he could not keep up. ...read more.

Middle

Henry's lack of military power was another thing that set him apart from the rest of Europe. Due to the fact that Henry was not as big as the other countries and that he could not pay his soldiers as much Henry simply did not have as bigger army as other dominant powers. This depicted Henry as weak to his fellow leaders, thus making him seem unimportant and not worth taking too much notice of. Wolsey was one of the reasons that Henry did not achieve his aims, this is because however much Wolsey helped Henry he would always be against him due to his want of the papacy. This meant that Henry never got what he quite wanted, and his ideas were always slightly adjusted, thus never giving Henry's desired outcome. The relationships within Europe were another reason Henry's aims were never accomplished, Wolsey would make alliances but Henry would regularly fall out with the other leaders splitting up the alliances. ...read more.

Conclusion

Whereas Henry was almost broke and struggled to raise funds to go to war. In conclusion Henry's lack of power and dominance and the fact there were strong leaders in Europe meant he was not taken as seriously as the others, and he could do nothing to make them listen, as he simply did not have the resources to challenge them. The other greater powers meant Henry had no chance of coming into line with them as he could not grow in power quicker than them, especially with the money he had. If Henry had gone with Wolsey's ideas totally then Henry may have found his glory in peace rather than war, and in turn saved more money. This would have meant he could have executed his foreign policy better. Unfortunately this never happened therefore meaning that Henry never achieved his foreign policy aims by 1529. ?? ?? ?? ?? Tom Gerrett 12JT History 23rd November 2005 ...read more.

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