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The cardiovascular system is made up of 3 parts. The heart, Blood vessels and blood.

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Introduction

Cardiovascular System The cardiovascular system is made up of 3 parts. The heart, Blood vessels and blood. The cardiovascular system is responsible for Delivering oxygen and nutrients to the body, Carrying hormones, removing waste products such as Co2 and lactic acid and maintaining the body temperature. The Flow of blood around the heart In order to make its journey around the body blood is carried through five different blood vessels. These are the; arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules and veins. * left atrium receives oxygenated blood from lungs through pulmonary vein (only veins carry pure blood) * pure blood(oxygenated) is pumped to left ventricle through bicuspid and pump to all the other parts of the body through aorta * right atrium receives de oxygenated blood from all parts of the body * impure blood(de oxygenated) pumped to right ventricle through tricuspid and pump to lungs through pulmonary artery(only artery carries impure blood) for oxygenation. Blood flows through the heart and around the body in one direction. It is known as the one way street. This is because of the valves in the heart that only let the blood go one way. ...read more.

Middle

The left atrium contracts and pushes blood down through the bicuspid valve and into the left ventricle. Then the left ventricle contracts and the bicuspid valve closes to prevent blood flowing back into the heart. The blood is then pushed up and out of the heart through the semi lunar valve into the aorta which is the big artery leaving the heart taking blood to the rest of the body. The heart then relaxes and the semi lunar valves close to prevent blood flowing back into the heart. Components of blood Blood is the medium in which all the cells are carried to transport nutrients and oxygen to the cells of the body. Blood is made up of four components. These are red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and plasma. Blood is made up of 55% plasma and 45% solids. Red blood cells 99% of red blood cells are red blood cells or erythrocytes. They are red in colour due to the prescience of a red coloured protein called haemoglobin. Haemoglobin has a massive attraction for oxygen and the main role of the red blood cell is to take on and transport oxygen to the cells. ...read more.

Conclusion

They have thick muscular walls which contract and relax to send blood to all parts of the body. The main artery leaving the heart leaving the heart is the aorta. It then splits up into smaller vessels which are called arterioles which are just little arteries. Artery walls contain elastic cartilage and smooth muscle. With this flexible wall it allows the vessels to expand and contract. This helps push blood along the length of the arteries. This is called peristalsis and means how smooth muscle contracts. Arteries do not contain any valves as they are not required and they carry oxygenated blood. The pulmonary artery is an exception as it carries deoxygenated blood away from the heart. Capillaries Once the arteries and arterioles have divided they will eventually send blood into the smallest blood vessels. The capillaries are found in all parts of the body especially the muscles. They are so small their walls are 1 cell thick. There are tiny spaces within these thin cell walls which allow oxygen and other nutrients to pass through. This is called diffusion. The blood flows very slowly through the capillaries to allow for this process. In the capillaries the blood will also pick up waste products of metabolism, carbon dioxide and lactic acid. ...read more.

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