• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Working With Children

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Working With Children In Outdoor Education A child is not a mini adult. This is a very important statement to understand when working with children in any situation. Understanding this will enable the teacher/instructor to set a programme of work, which considers the needs of children, with regards to their stages of growth and development. In 1976 D.L. Gallahue stated: "Without a clear understanding of children we become teachers of content rather than teachers of children" Development The development of an individuals needs can be looked at under a number of different headings. Intellectual Development - an increase in skill and complexity of function occurs as part of the progress towards maturity Physical Development - the growth and development of the muscles, bones and energy systems of the body Social Development - the development of relationships with peers groups and the adult world Emotional Development - the development of an individual's self concept Everybody has a chronological age, which represents the age of the person in calendar years. ...read more.

Middle

First two years - rapid motor development Pre School - all basic locomotor skills normally established: development of range of eye and limb co-ordination 8 years Adolescence - wide range of physical skills developed Adolescence Adult - reinforcement of previously learned skills, introduction to new skills Physical Development Growth can be defined as: An increase in physical size of the whole or any parts, dimensions or tissues, that occurs as part of the child's progress towards maturity. There are a number of factors which affect the rate of growth of an individual; * Maternal nutrition * Abuse during pregnancy e.g. smoking * Nutrition during early months/years * Physical activity during childhood * Genes - inherited characteristics The rate of growth of a child up to post adolescence is continuous but not consistent. The teacher/instructor will be familiar with growth spurts. A child in the class completes the last course of lessons (swimming) ...read more.

Conclusion

joints maintained and extended * Development of muscles * Increase in strength * Development of cardio-respiratory system Social and Emotional Development Children's social development is influenced by a number of factors, their home life, their school, their friends and also their own stage of emotional development. Although a child may be an early physical developer, the teacher/instructor must remember that their social and emotional development may not have reached the same stage. A good example of this would be the five year old child who is tall for his age and, as a result of this, has also developed motor skills above the level of most children of the same age. It is easy for the teacher/instructor to expect this child to behave in the manner of an older child just because of his appearance. If his social and emotional development is also taken into consideration the teacher/instructor may be able to establish a better relationship based on lower expectations of his social abilities. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Acquiring, Developing & Performance Skill essays

  1. Sports Development

    (Game Plan, 2002) Sport can also boost the economy of a country and help to provide jobs related to sport in a variety of positions. The department for culture media and sport estimates that there are over 400,000 jobs related to sport and over �10 billion is spent on sports goods and activities.

  2. Technique Sheet Activity - Swimming Front Crawl

    athletes lead leg to be straight over the top of the hurdle. The athlete allowed the trailing knee to sweep wide and flat over the hurdle. It was clear from this observation that the athlete was slightly too high over the hurdle which I feel was due to the lead

  1. sport development

    Such scheme could be tailored and delivered locally, but it might be put into action in several areas at once. Operational schemes tend to be delivered b professionals. Advisory Sports development people can be asked to act an advisory role.

  2. Purpose And Aim Of Training Programme.

    Finally the method of training was interval because I was trying to get quality punches into the bag. SECOND SESSION Activity Reps Distance Time Weight Intensity Press-ups 20 - - - 70% Arm-curl 20 - - 5 70% Skipping 100 - - - 65% Aspect Of Fitness Principle Of Training

  1. A balanced diet for children

    Comfort foods (ii) Eg: Sweets and Chocolates (iii) Properties of food products (colour, texture, shape, etc.) and the way these can be used to appeal to children - Social factors (ii) Influenced by parents, peer and media (iii) Marketing and other promotional activities Eg: Targeted at children, including TV advertising and promotions in schools.

  2. Personal Exercise Programme

    * Neck muscles - these are stretched by turning your neck in different directions or pushing against a force (using your forehead) supplied by your interlocked hands Having stretched off after carrying out your warm up, you are now ready to take part in your activity.

  1. Personal Exercise programme

    able to provide the body with the oxygen need to perform * Agility- the ability to change direction quickly and accurately at speed. In hockey it necessary to obtain a combination of speed, balance, power and co ordination for agility.

  2. Personal Exercise Programme.

    After a period of heavy training, he studied the rat muscle and found that the transplanted muscle had doubled its weight and tripled its strength. ...stimulated new muscle fibres...suggestion for satellite cells in muscle hypertrophy...theses helped in the production of new fibres (Barton-Davis, Shoturma, and Sweeney, 1999)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work