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European decolonisation after the World War Two.

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Introduction

European decolonisation after the World War Two Background of European colonisation: * European colonisation started since European Powers navigated and explored around the world in 15th century. * European Powers colonized on every continents. * The pace of European colonisation went faster after the Industrial Revolution, because of advance in technology of European Powers and their higher desire for colonies. * At the early 20th century, over 10000000square miles and 150million population were under colonial rule. Why European Powers established colonial empire? * Rise of imperialism - European Powers seek for colonies in the object of imperialistic power expansion. * External trade - After the Industrial Revolution, productivity of European countries increased sharply that local consumption wasn't adequate to absorb it. ...read more.

Middle

* Burma independent in 1948. * Ski Lanka independent in 1948. * Malaya independent in 1957. * Ghana independent in 1957. * Kenya independent in 1963. * Zimbabwe independent in 1980. French decolonisation: * Vietnam independent in 1954. * Algeria independent in 1962. Portugal decolonisation: * Guinea-Bissau independent in 1974. * Cape Verde independent in 1975. * Mozambique independent in 1975. * Angola independent in 1975. Spain decolonisation: * Sahara independent in 1975. Belgium decolonisation: * Congo independent in 1959. * Zaire independent in 1960. Reasons for European decolonisation after World War Two: * Economic interest * Military * Protests of colonies * Resistance from United Nation, new risen powers and colonial states * Domestic dissent Economic interest * Promotion of free-trade means colonies no longer needed for exporting excess productivity. ...read more.

Conclusion

Protest of colonies * Rise of human-right and desire of self-determination stimulated European colonies demand for independent. * Armed struggle again colonialism. * Protests of colonies made them more difficult to rule and maintain. * Protests of colonies increased domestic and also international pressure. Resistance from United Nation and new risen powers * Establish of United Nation enhanced the emphasize of equality among countries and international cooperate. Growing influence of ex-colonies in UN. * Europe lost their leading position in the world. Instead, USA and USSR became 2 Superpowers after World War Two. Both of these 2 post-war Superpowers opposed colonialism. * These 2 forces resisted European countries maintain their colonies in post-war period. * Furthermore, Colonialism was outdated in modern diplomacy. Domestic dissent * Local population refuse to sacrifice and burden for maintain colonies. * Immigrate from colonies weakened local people's competitiveness. Implication of European decolonisation: * End of Imperialism. * End of Colonialism. * End of European hegemony. ...read more.

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