• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With close reference to at least 2 poems explore how the poets create a sense of mood and atmosphere.

Extracts from this document...


With close reference to at least 2 poems explore how the poets create a sense of mood and atmosphere. 4^th April 2003 Katie Lowe In "Porphyria's Lover" by Robert Browning and "Mariana" by Alfred Tennyson, the poets use many different literary techniques to create a sense of mood and atmosphere. They choose their language and vocabulary carefully to make the reader use all of their senses, using techniques such as imagery, rhyme and rhythm. "Porphyria's Lover" begins with a description of the rain and the "sullen wind" which makes the mood seem dark and gloomy, though unlike in "Mariana," this changes later in the poem. This is shown when he appears to be sulking when Porphyria calls and he does not respond. However, Porphyria's entrance into the cottage causes the atmosphere to become warmer by lighting the "cheerless grate," which again could mirror her lover's feelings for her in the same way as the setting in "Mariana" reflects the main character's emotions. ...read more.


The only repetition used in "Porphyria's Lover" is that of the word "and" at the start of lines 14-21 which makes the pace appear to speed up, as if the thoughts and events are moving faster until the break after he says, "murmuring how she loved me-," which brings the poem to an abrupt stop. This causes the reader to stop and think about the events that took place before the pause, and makes the reader want to read on to find out what happens next. Throughout the poem the disjointed rhythms make the poem feel tense but still fairly fast moving. In "Mariana," there are few surprises in the rhythm as the structure is quite rigid and rarely changes. However, Browning puts surprises both in the rhythm and the story in "Porphyria's Lover" by ending sentences in the middle of lines, such as "Three times her little throat around, and strangled her." ...read more.


As Porphyria is murdered, very little punctuation is used so the reader can almost imagine Porphyria's hair being "wound three times her little throat around" gently and softly. The flowing rhythm makes the mood eerily calm, and this feeling continues right to the end of the poem. The opposite effect is created in "Mariana," as Tennyson uses punctuation such as commas and semi-colons to create breaks, which gives the poem a slow pulse and almost shows the passage of time that Mariana has to put up with. The last three to four lines of each poem have many similarities. Both refer to God, showing the religious thoughts of the time, and, more importantly, the both leave the reader wondering what happens next, and leave many questions unanswered. "Porphyria's Lover" and "Mariana" are both examples of how poets can create depressing and eerie moods and atmosphere using clever vocabulary, imagery, rhyme and rhythm. I think that the poems are both quite romantic, but are both examples of how too much love can be a bad thing. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Robert Browning section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Robert Browning essays

  1. Discuss the importance of religion with reference to at least two poems within the ...

    The simple structuring can be related to that of a death scene, and true to the Bishop's character, his thoughts seem to be focused more the material loss of death, than the actual spiritualistic meaning. By materialistic, it is simply meant that we come to hear of the Bishop's life

  2. Compare and Contrast Tennyson's 'Mariana' with Browning's 'Porphyria's Lover'. What is the emotional state ...

    He was surprised by her active response and his fast-beating heart made him eager to treasure the special moment forever. However, there is an element of cold and brutal rationality about his thought process. 'He debated what to do' and the repetition of the word 'mine' suggests his mad possessiveness.

  1. Discuss the importance of religion with reference to at least two poems within the ...

    The bishop is a character who is up front in the way in which he speaks. He is honest in his speech - it is not elaborated, simply spoken. This is also true to the situation of the character, who is on his deathbed.

  2. Compare the ways in which three poets explore the nature of rejected and isolated ...

    Browning explores the jealousy and vengefulness of someone disappointed in love. Hitcher by Simon Armitage. It is a monologue of sorts, in which a man confesses to murder. We notice that he is at once like, and yet unlike, his victim.

  1. With detailed reference to three poems, compare and contrast how effectively the poets have ...

    It is maybe to show a sort of fantasy effect. The poet's choice of vocabulary is very normal and has a sort of calming effect. This adds to the tone of the story very well. Power is the main tone in the poem.

  2. Compare the Ways that Poets Write About Violence in at least four of the ...

    However what is very different is the way Browning concentrates on the reasoning behind the murder, the speaker is full of anger at vengeful thoughts at her lover's betrayal and is obsessed with the making of the murder weapon, in this case poison.

  1. Consider how two poets use their craft to create a powerful narrative.

    The killer believes that Porphyria is his Woman and he is the only one that deserves her and he has not done or is doing anything bad. He believes he has a 'right' over her and therefore by killing her has not done anything wrong.

  2. How do Tennyson and Browning establish a distinct sense of character in their poetry?

    His language also sounds quite educated. "Strangers like you that pictured countenance" seem to be the words of an educated man, and not some commoner who would not have known this language in the time at which the poem was set. This line also sounds quite pompous and dignified.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work