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Flooding in Bangladesh

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Introduction

Geography Coursework Flooding in Bangladesh By ... Intro Bangladesh is located in southern Asia; India borders Bangladesh to the west and Myanmar (Burma) to the east. Nepal and Bhutan are north of Bangladesh. The Bay of Bengal is situated south of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is roughly the same size as the UK; however the population in Bangladesh is superior with 110m to the UK's 60m. Dharker is the capital and the most populated region of Bangladesh. The GNP of Bangladesh is only 180$ which is a staggering difference with the UK's, which is 20500$. Most of the terrain in Bangladesh is flat and low-lying, although there are still hills in the north-east that rise to 200m and hills in the south east that are 600m. The three main rivers in south Asia, the Ganges, the Meghma and the Brahmaputra have formed Bangladesh from depositing sediment; they all flow from the Himalayas in different countries and meet in Bangladesh, as they flow through Bangladesh they split up into a giant area of Delta. Bangladesh is one of the poorest countries in the world; a reason for this is because they mainly export ready made garments and primary goods like shrimp, leather and jute. Bangladesh has a tropical monsoon-type climate, with a hot and rainy summer and a dry winter. ...read more.

Middle

By researching information on causes of flooding in Bangladesh I can conclude that there is not one single factor for the abnormal flooding in Bangladesh, it is a result of a number of things. They can form when monsoon rains and tropical cyclones take place at the same time, also the constant affect of deforestation and global warming do not help. Deforestation brings silt to the rivers causing it to become shallower. Global warming causes mountains to melt which then causes the rivers to become deeper. Monsoon rains and Tropical Cyclones also cause the rivers to increase in depth. When everything combines, the rivers break their banks and this results in destructive flooding. Solutions Building 7 metre embankments all along the rivers channel would help to prevent flooding in Bangladesh, because the river would be able to hold more water. This project would also provide jobs for people living in Bangladesh. However when abnormal floods occur the water would break out of the banks and the high banks would stop the water being recalled back into the river. This water outside of the river would become stagnant. Malaria and dengue are among main dangers of stagnant water, which can become a breeding ground for the mosquitoes that transmit these diseases, also over time the embankments would gragually erode. ...read more.

Conclusion

I have chosen these solutons to stop deathes by flooding, of course stoping the floods would obviously be the best solution but in my opinion none of the flood action plans; afforestation, artificial levees and embankments will not stop flooding, the embankments, however tall they are will eventually get washed away by erosion. Afforestation will take too long for the trees and their roots to grow big enough in order to stop flooding in the mean time many floods will occur, anyway Bangladeshi people have cut down the trees in the past, they might cut these one's down as well. The problem with artificial levees is that they require substantial engineering and in my opinion Bangladesh do not have enough money to build artificial levees on all of the rivers which flow through Bangladesh, also artificial levees involve a vast amount of complxed building and I feel that the Bangladeshi people would not be able to handle the construction, so Bangladesh may have to pay special builders to help, these people would want to be paid for their work and as the Bangladeshi government would of already spent a lot of money on the material for artifiacial levees they would not be happy in paying more money for the building. This is why I have not chosen artificial levees, afforestation or embankments as a solution. ?? ?? ?? ?? Geography Coursework ...read more.

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