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Communication in organisations.

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Introduction

Communication is "The transmission of information, ideas, attitudes, or emotion from one person or group to another (or others) primarily through symbols" (Theodorson and Thoedorson, 1969). Communication can take place in a number of forms, including verbal communication, written communication and non-verbal communication. In virtually all types of communication, and certainly marketing communications, the following elements are present: The Sender (source, transmitter) All communication requires that there be a sender from which the communication stems. This could be, for example, a broadcasting authority, the editor of a newspaper or an employer or marketer. The Reciever (audience) The second key element in the communication process is the party or person with which we wish to communicate. Unless and until the intended audience receives the message, there is no possibility of effective communication. In many cases the target audience for marketing communications is the customer or at least the potential customer. However, much marketing communication is also aimed at persons or parties other than the customer. For example, communications may be aimed at others who influence the purchasing process. Similarly, communications may be aimed at 'publics' important to the company, such as shareholders, local communities, and even politicians and governments. ...read more.

Middle

A model may make it possible to predict outcomes or the course of events. The Lasswell Formula (1948) The Lasswell Formula (Lasswell 1948) is a convienient and comprehensive way of introducing people to the study of the communication process. This model is a simplified representation of the process and it more or less takes for granted that the communicator has some intention of influencing the receiver and, hence, that communication should be treated mainly as a persuasive process. It assumes that messages always have effects. The model also omits the element of feedback. Marketing communications, are an important tool of marketing for a variety of reasons. It is impossible to sell your products and services if nobody knows of their existence. Similarly, it can be difficult to market a product if customers have little information about your company. Even if the customers are familiar with both product and company, they may still require 'a little persuading' in order to be convinced that they actually need the product. All these are situations where, without effective marketing communication, making a sale is difficult. The process here are those of creating awareness, generating interest, heightening desire, and ultimately creating action in the form of a sale. ...read more.

Conclusion

The receiver decodes the 'information' as a 'message', which in it's turn is transformed at the destination into 'meaning'. If there is correspondence between the two 'meanings' the result is communication. But, as DeFleur said, this correspondence is seldom perfect. The model shows how the source gets it's feedback, which gives the source a possibility of adapting more effectively it's way of communicating to the destination. The model also shows that noise can occur during any part of the communication process. Effective marketing communications, where a message is received and understood in the way they intended it to be involves careful planning. Successful business communications have the ability to transfere and receive information using the most appropriate channel. They eliminate barriers to communication and proceed without prejudice, bias and unsuitable language in line with the needs of the recipient. 'Shared meaning' is more than the successful transmission of words from one party to another, but requires sound mutual understanding of each other, and the active participation of both sender and receiver. An organisation must understand what it's market wants, and a market must understand what an organisation is offering and how that will fulfil their needs and wants. ...read more.

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