• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Crusades

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Holy Wars of the Middle Ages in Europe and the Middle East, otherwise known as the Crusades, were overall a successful, although not completely moral, means of spreading and revitalizing Christian faith in Europe. The commencement of the Crusades was in the favor of Christianity, but as the Crusades heightened, things had gotten out of hand and had degraded the religion near the end. The Crusades were essentially a series of religious military expeditions that were cast to conflict with internal and external threats to their religion. They had primarily begun in the year 1095 and had been continued for the next 200 years to follow1. The First Crusade, the key Crusade that had started everything, was the initial (Christian) march onto Jerusalem, or the Holy Land, and the main objective in mind was to reclaim what was the holiest place in Christian history since the very beginning: Jerusalem, or the 'City of Gods,' where Jesus Christ had been born, raised, and killed.2 Not only was the intent of this mission to regain the land, but also to give a chance for Christians to pay a pilgrimage and seek redemption. For the Muslims however, Jerusalem was significant because it enclosed the Dome of the Rock where Muhammad, founder of the Muslim faith, had once sat and prayed.3 With the achievement of retrieving the land for the Christians, they had a new incentive that consisted of devastating the entire Muslim population in the region that they had just invaded. ...read more.

Middle

enormous amounts of wealth believed to be at Jerusalem.13 The citizens who would participate in the voyages would be excused from taxes and would have their status protected by the Church so they would not have to deal with any hassles.14 Because of the Pope's decision to lie about Christian laws and to corrupt the teachings of Christ, the entire religion became flawed and defective. Everyone had been embarking on these quests for the wrong reasons. Every Christian had followed their religion for their own motives whether they were personal or financial. However, there were people who were converted into Christianity through the message of hope rather than personal will to join. Christian forces were keen on invading all the Muslim territories and converting the entire Islamic race to Christianity to prove their superiority over every other religion.15 However, the Muslim population was not devoted to this destructive conversion. Muslims felt a sense of pride being Muslims and would rather fight and kill the offenders, or even die, than to convert to Christianity.16 Regardless of what Christians would do, it was against Muslim religion to lose faith, as the Quran makes clear: "4:89 - They long that ye should disbelieve even as they disbelieve, that ye may be upon a level (with them). So choose not friends from them till they forsake their homes in the way of Allah; if they turn back (to enmity) ...read more.

Conclusion

New York: Press Orchard Park. 6 Hallam, Elizabeth. 'Chronicles of the Crusades: Eye-Witness Accounts of the Wars Between Christianity and Islam'. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. 7 "Crusades." Encyclopedia Britannica. 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online School Edition. 11 April 2008. <http://school.eb.com/eb/article-25599> 8 "The Christian Crusades." The Christian Crusades (1095-1291). General Board of Global Ministries. <http://gbgm-umc.org/UMW/bible/crusades.stm> (19 April 2008). 9 Skip Knox, E. L. "The Crusades." Boise State University. <http://crusades.boisestate.edu/> (20 April 2008). 10 "Crusades." Encyclopedia Britannica. 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online School Edition. 11 April 2008. <http://school.eb.com/eb/article-25599> 11 Munro, Dana C. "The Popes and the Crusades." American Philosophical Society, Vol. 55, No. 5 (1916): 348-356. JSTOR. 19 April 2008. <www.jstor.org/> 12 "The Real History of the Crusades." Mike Todd. <http://www.brutallyhonest.org/brutally_honest/2005/06/the_real_histor.html> [18 April 2008] 13 Nicholson, Nigel. "Crusades Influences." Nigel Nicholson. <http://homepage.ntlworld.com/nigel.nicholson/hn/CrusadeFAQs/f-change.html> [19 April 2008] 14 Nicholson, Nigel. "Crusades Influences." Nigel Nicholson. <http://homepage.ntlworld.com/nigel.nicholson/hn/CrusadeFAQs/f-change.html> [19 April 2008] 15 Hallam, Elizabeth. 'Chronicles of the Crusades: Eye-Witness Accounts of the Wars Between Christianity and Islam'. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. 16 Owens, Josh. "Tolerance and Forced Conversion During The Crusades." Helium. <http://www.helium.com/items/288083-tolerance-forced-conversion-during> (20 April 2008) 17 Hallam, Elizabeth. 'Chronicles of the Crusades: Eye-Witness Accounts of the Wars Between Christianity and Islam'. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson. 18 Dafoe, Stephen A. 'In Praise of the New Knighthood'. <http://www.templarhistory.com> [April 20, 2008] 19 Dafoe, Stephen A. 'In Praise of the New Knighthood'. <http://www.templarhistory.com> [April 20, 2008] 20 Dafoe, Stephen A. 'In Praise of the New Knighthood'. <http://www.templarhistory.com> [April 20, 2008] 21 Owens, Josh. "Tolerance and Forced Conversion During The Crusades." Helium. <http://www.helium.com/items/288083-tolerance-forced-conversion-during> (20 April 2008) 22 < http://www.crusades-encyclopedia.com/apologyforthecrusades.html> ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate History section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate History essays

  1. Analysis of Erasmus's Work: The Praise of Folly

    In general, Erasmus strongly disapproved of the excesses of the Church, which were brought attention of the public with the Praise of Folly. The messages conveyed by Erasmus are so effective because of the structure and style in which he writes his book.

  2. Developments of Music During the Middle Ages

    Secular songs of the Middle Ages created fixed musical forms, which would prove to be exceptionally important in all following eras of music. Signficant contributions to music were made in all eras, including the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary. However, the medieval period holds a seat of importance as the

  1. Revson notes on the Middle Ages + their Heritage the Idea of Unity ...

    by Germanic tribes, therefore we need to look at the Germanic heritage - 2 important factors concerning this heritage: 1) kinship + the vendetta - if an individual was injured in person /property he sought compensation from the kin of those that hurt him, either before a "royal" judge or

  2. The Crusades. Were the Christian Attacks on Muslims Justified?

    ?killed and captured many? and ?destroyed the churches and devastated the empire?? (Halsall). The Christians believed the Muslims were nit treating the Christians justly, so it was the responsibility of the Christians to defend what they so strongly believed in and what was a huge part of their lives.

  1. Crisis and Collapse in Spain between 1793 and 1808

    The Peruvian bureaucrat and intellectual jose baquijano y carillo,for example, noted that the cortes had failed to fulfill the promises made in 1810. By refusing to establish equal representation and free trade, its ?antipolitical conduct has been the true origin of the desperation of the American people; the cortes never wanted to hear their complaints, nor listen to their propositions?.

  2. The Westeinde is one of the higher parts of The Hague, and the story ...

    Gerrit for his part, had come to be a man of considerable importance and influence. His full list of titles and dignities was "Gerrit of Assendelft, Heemskerk, Castricum, Cronenburg and Assumburg, Cralingen, Overschie and Schiebroek". He had also become a favourite of the Emperor, Charles V, and he was for

  1. The Life of an Influential Christian - C.S. Lewis

    He studied Norse mythology in the pursuit of joy, an aspect he was desperately missing in his life. His time spent at Malvern was miserable, mostly due to people who made up rumors about him being h********l. During this time he lost his Christian faith, and had major disagreements with his brother.

  2. Notes on the History and Development of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    - Israel yielded the vast expanse of the Sinai and also gave up oil fields in Sinai. - The Camp David Accords contained provisions that have formed the basis of all subsequent peace negotiations. Following the Intifada - At the Algiers Conference of November 1988, the PNC proclaimed the independent

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work