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Consider the political implications of seeing and being seen in Nineteen Eight-Four and The Orchard, focussing on one passage or scene from each book, and one relevant image or written text you collect from print media.

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Introduction

Essay One: The Orchard and Nineteen Eighty-Four both describe cultures that "encourage us to see ourselves as others see us". Consider the political implications of seeing and being seen in Nineteen Eight-Four and The Orchard, focussing on one passage or scene from each book, and one relevant image or written text you collect from print media. The Orchard, Nineteen Eighty-Four and Doug's Story, all describe cultures that have both subservant characters as well as dominant ones; creating an unequal society. The political figures affect how the individuals see themselves; through many techniques including creating institutions, generating propaganda, having constant surveillance and interpellation of genders. I endeavour to examine each of these tools on their success to affect their victims and influence the society. Nineteen-Eighty Four is a dramatic novel which examines Orwell's speculation of a possible future under a communist-dominated regime. It eliminates freewill "there will be no thought, as we understand it now. Orthodoxy means not thinking-not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness."1 The political implications of seeing and being seen in 1984 is that due to constant surveillance and brainwashing, someone's perception of reality can be altered, so that they truly believe they are living in utopian society, which is actually dystopic. ...read more.

Middle

Proving she believed she wasn't alive to be just an object of men's desire, but to be her true self without hegemonic discourses. The political implications of seeing and being seen in The Orchard is that women are culturally habituated into this role as the 'surveyed'; making it is hard for them to create their own identity Eg. The amount of male politicians in one cabinet outweighs females by approx. 5:1. This shows that much interpellation of current events is probably biased. Eg "It would be folly to expect that women will ever dominate or even approach equal representation" dictated by the politician Tony Abbot. Making it hard for women to break away from their stereotypical unified self of seeing and being seen and create their own. Expressed in the metaphor "our (meaning women) lives swim in a sea of seeing and being seen."23 To compare Nineteen Eight-Four and The Orchard, a woman will implant a telescreen in her psyche to reflect what her surveyor wants; thereby conforming to avoid punishment. Just like Winston, who needs to watch his every move to avoid being vaporised. All of these points are examined closely on pgs 145-147. ...read more.

Conclusion

15 pg304 of Nineteen Eighty-Four 16 pg 311 of Nineteen Eighty- Four 17 pg295 of Nineteen Eighty-Four 18 Michael Payne, ed., A Dictionary of Cultural and Critical Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.1997 19 John Berger., Ways of Seeing. London. Penguin 1972 20 John Berger., Ways of Seeing. London. Penguin 1972 21 John Berger., Ways of Seeing. London. Penguin 1972 22 Drusilla Modjeska, The Orchard[1994](Australia: Macmillan,2000) pg.143 23 Pg. 117 of The Orchard. 24 Pg. 117 of The Orchard 25 Pg. 145 of The Orchard 26 pg. 146 of The Orchard 27 pg 146 of The Orchard 28 pg.145-147 of The Orchard. 29 Pg 311 of Nineteen Eighty-Four 30 Liz Gooch, Hidden Stories told through art, http://theage.com.au/news/Arts/Hidden-stories-told-through-art/2005/04/20/1113854259... 23/04/05 31 Joan Kirner "This I Believe" John Marsden., This I Believe: eminent Australians explore the biggest question of all (Australia: Random House)p.197 32 Liz Gooch, Hidden Stories told through art, http://theage.com.au/news/Arts/Hidden-stories-told-through-art/2005/04/20/1113854259... 23/04/05 33 Micheal Foucault, "Panopticism" in Jessia Evans and Stuart Hall., "Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage (London,1999) pg 63 34 34 Micheal Foucault, "Panopticism" in Jessia Evans and Stuart Hall., "Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage (London,1999) pg 63 35 35 Joan Kirner "This I Believe" John Marsden., This I Believe: eminent Australians explore the biggest question of all (Australia: Random House)p.199 ...read more.

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