• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

IDENTIFY CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF LOCAL CRIME PREVENTION PLANNING. DISCUSS THE BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGAGING RELEVANT STAKEHOLDERS:

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

IDENTIFY CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF LOCAL CRIME PREVENTION PLANNING. DISCUSS THE BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGAGING RELEVANT STAKEHOLDERS: Contemporary criminological philosophy has placed significant weight on the role of planning, preparation, and development of crime prevention strategies in the endeavour of successfully reducing crime. This is largely due to prevention measures being tailored to specific conditions and not broad context and nature of crime as it not possible to recommend measures that fit all situations (Geason S, Wilson R 1988: 10). Moving away from broad state level responses to crime, current approaches have placed importance on local governments and community patnerships. Adopting a patnership perspective is effective in addressing areas of crime in which traditonal agencies fail to cover. Conversly, a partnershp perspective can give rise to various problems especially problems associated with the involvment of relevant stakeholders. The purpose of this essay is to identify key elements of a crime prevention plan while taking into consideration the benefits and challenges of engaging relevant stakeholders. By exploring these two key areas a better understanding of local crime prevention planning will be gained. The development of a local crime prevention plan needs to incorporate partnerships between local government and relevant stakeholders. The partnership model is underpinned by the key assumption that community safety by its nature is a multi-faceted problem and beyond the capacity of any single agency to address (Cherney 2004:237). The involvement of local government with other relevant bodies is seen as the most effective way of delivering effective crime prevention, giving rise to numerous benefits (Crawford and Jones 1995). ...read more.

Middle

advises for this to occur successfully, one person should be appointed to implement the plan and for keeping projects on course. Ideally, this should be a council employee who is also involved in the partnership group (Attorneys General Department 2007) A major setback in the implementation process that needs to be taken into account, is the availability of funds to carry out the proposed strategies. Funding is one of the most significant reasons in accomplishing goals, as the monetary resources can be difficult to gain. Obtaining these funds consists consultation of relevant stakeholders, whom ultimately would benefit from the plan, but also funding from state governments in the form of grants. The importance of controlling these funds can be conveyed in the development of a project budget. The final stage in the development of a crime prevention plan is the monitoring and evaluation phases. A crucial aspect of the plan, evaluation is critical because provides valuable information about the programs appropriateness, acceptability to important stakeholders, efficacy and efficiency (English et al 2002: 119). The key to success of this stage is the incorporation of the evaluated information into a new plan, or new strategies. Evaluation is wasted time and money if the results are not fed back into the planning process (Crime Division of NSW 2007). There are numerous ways to evaluate the success of a plan as English et al (pg 127) outlines five various approaches to good evaluation; goal-based, decision orientated, systems analysis, professional review, and illuminative/responsive. Designed to achieve different objectives, they all aim to assist in the crime prevention planning process. ...read more.

Conclusion

last accessed 21/5/07 Cherney A (2004) 'Crime Preventino/Community Safety Patnership in Action: Victorian Experience' Current Issues in Criminal Justic Vol 15, No, 3 ' Children (Protection and Parental Responsibility) Act 1997 cited in www.legislation.nsw.gov.au Last accessed 21/5/07 Crawford A, Jones R (1995) Inter-agency and community based crime prevention- some reflections on the work of Pearson and colleagues British Journal of Criminology Vol 35 No.1 Winter 1995 Crime Prevention Division NSW (2007) 'Resources Manual' http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lawlink/cpd/ll_cpd.nsf/pages/CPD_index last accessed 21/5/07 Dubbo City council (2002) 'Dubbo Crime Prevention Plan' www.dubbo.nsw.gov.au/repositories/files/CPP-COUNCIL-APPROVED-JULY-2002.pdf last accessed 20/5/07 English B; Cummings R Stratro R (2003) 'Choosing and Evaluation Model for Community Creim Prevention Programs in Tilley N Evaluations in crime prevention, Crime Prevnetion Studies Volume 14 Geason S, Wilson R (1988: 10-13) 'planning a crime prevention program Crime prevention : theory and practice Australian Institute of Criminology Gilling D (2000) Policing, Crime Prevention and Partnerships in Leishman F; Loveday, B and Savage S (eds) Core issues in Policing 2nd Edition Longman London Gori P ( 2001 ) COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION AND THE 'PARTNERSHIP APPROACH': A SAFE COMMUNITY FOR EVERYONE? European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 9: 447-457, 2001. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Netherlands. Laycock G Nick Tilley (1995) Building a Safer Society: Strategic Approaches to Crime Prevention. Crime and Justice, Vol. 19 pp. 535-584. Manly City Council (2002) 'Crime Profile' www.manly.nsw.gov.au/downloaddocument.aspx?DocumentID=97 Last accessed 21/5/07 Queensland Government 'A Strategic framework for community crime prevention' Published by Crime Prevention Queensland, Department of the Premier & Cabinet. Queensland Government (2002) 'BUILDING SAFER COMMUNITIES : A CRIME PREVENTION MANUAL FOR QUEENSLAND' Published by Crime Prevention Queensland, Department of the Premier & Cabinet. Sampson A, Stubbs P, Smith D, Pearson G, Blagg H (1988) 'Crime localities and the multi-agency approach' Brit Journal of Criminology Vol 28. No 4 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Criminology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Criminology essays

  1. prevention of youth crime

    (Elliot, E. & Gordon, R. 2005 Pg: 46) The purpose of conferencing is to allow the offender to come to terms and affect responsibility for their own behaviour. It is built as to seek out rights, needs and abilities of the child to maximize self respect and responsibility.

  2. Can there be such a thing as a victimless crime? Discuss with examples.

    If there is an accident it is only them that suffers through not wearing these safety features. In this case it would appear to be a 'victimless crime', however one could consider that the insurance company may have to pay out more because a seatbelt wasn't worn and then insurance

  1. Compare positivist approaches to crime with at least two other perspectives discussed in the ...

    According to research the mesomorphs are more likely to engage in criminal behaviour. One of the most useful points of the biological positivist approach is that it sets criminals as first in terms of importance in criminology research. This perspective treats criminals as people having a special personality that deserves to be the centre of criminological studies.

  2. Comparative policing systems

    an extensive investigation, the police nationale is composed of some 120,000 officers - now according to Interpol 126,000 - whereas the Gendarmerie comprises some 85,000 officers - now according to Interpol 90,000 (2009) - (2005). Moreover, there are some 3000 small municipal police forces.

  1. Research proposal

    Carlson 19979 found that a history of violence tags along future emotional aspects which entrap women thus complicating the process of leaving an abusive partner. When combined the above factors have implications on how domestic violence is interpreted and the perceptions held on women in abusive relationships.

  2. Critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the multi agency public protection arrangements. (MAPPA)

    Kemshall (2008, p. 72) argues that this causes problems for certain agencies such as mental health teams, who can be called upon to provide reports with regard to an offenders mental state. The mental health team may encounter problems managing the balance between patient confidentiality and public safety, which in

  1. Why has the United Kingdom adopted CCTV technology with such enthusiasm and how effective ...

    150.) Therefore, they were under increasing scrutiny and pressure to find effective methods of dramatically reducing crime in the UK. Further to this, in 1993, CCTV was ?thrust into the limelight? (Coleman and Norris 2000 p.

  2. Discuss the different academic responses to contemporary criticisms of the old police. How helpful ...

    This case shows how ineffective the constables were, for Rebecca searching for the shawl herself was more productive than finding a constable straight away, indicating that the constables are not reliable or efficient. The constables ineffectiveness due to lack of a wage could perhaps be a key contributing factor to the establishment of the metropolitan police force.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work