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Compare the ways in which the authors present the main characters "Growing Up" and "Flight" as learning something new

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Introduction

Compare the ways in which the authors present the main characters "Growing Up" and "Flight" as learning something new. The two stories are very similar in many ways. Both are about learning new things and the changing attitudes between the old and the young. Also the main learners in both stories are the older generation. In Flight it is the Grandfather while in Flight it is Robert Quick. Also in both stories the secondary learners are the younger generation Jenny in Growing Up and the mother of the younger generations seem to have already learned and accepted the lessons. However there is a slight difference I feel that in "Flight" it is more about accepting new concepts than about learning. In flight the first thing Quick realizes is that his daughters have grown up, he realizes this due to their lack of response to him and their lack of affection. This is how in lines 4 to 6 "He had hoped indeed that they might, as often before, been waiting at the corner of the road" and in line 25 to 26 "He shouted 'Hullo, hullo, children.' ...read more.

Middle

He learns of their hurtful ness in lines 75 to 105 when the girls first torture snort and then begin to attack him. But he then learns not to have fixed expectations of them when shortly after that in lines 125 to 136 they then begin to take care of him and nurse his wounds. A similar thing happens in Flight when the granddaughter first taunts her grandfather in lines 47 to 51, but then later 103 to 105 bring him a present as a peace offering showing him not to have fixed expectations either. Both the granddaughter in Flight and Jenny in Growing Up also learn something new by the end of the stories. The granddaughter realizes that her grandfather does not wish to spite her (as it seems in lines25 to 39) and is only trying to prevent her from getting married because he truly loves her, and he does not wish her to be unhappy. The author has presented this at the very end of the play, so that it has a lingering effect on the reader. ...read more.

Conclusion

Quick in Growing Up. The authors of both stories show them as being superior and show them as already understanding what the other characters are yet to learn. In Growing Up when Mr. Quick tells Mrs. Quick about the events of the day which have shocked him she merely replies "All you children- amusing her selves while we run the world." As if the events were perfectly normal and natural, because she already knows to expect it. The same is true for the Daughter in Flight she too shows that she understands both sides and knows what to expect when she converses with her father in lines 75 to 100 when she appears to have al the answers to the grandfather's questions. Both stories have a lot in common in the way the authors present the way in which the characters learn new things. This is especially true in terms of structure where the layout is close to identical. Though both stories seem to be about different themes they are very similar in comparison. Varun Mohandas ...read more.

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