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Compare the two poets Ted Hughes and Simon Armitage.

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Introduction

Compare the two poets Ted Hughes and Simon Armitage In the untitled poem by Simon Armitage, the poem describes to us a short story that happened many years ago. The story is of a 13-year-old boy during puberty, and not knowing how to deal with his feelings for a girl in his class. The boy heated up scissors in a flame in a chemistry lab and then handed them to the girl marking rings around her fingers. We presume that the boy in the story is the poet, Simon Armitage as the poem is written in 1st person. The poet now feels a little sorry for what he did but tries to excuse it using the sentence, '...that was just my butterfingered way, at 13 of asking you to marry me.' In this quote he tries to use his age as an excuse as he was only young. The poet telling the story does not actually say that he is sorry but we get that impression from the quote, 'Don't believe me, please, if I say...' when the poet was 13 though we get a different opinion of what he was feeling, we get the impression that he felt amused, proud and triumphant of what he had done, but know looking back does not feel the same as he did. ...read more.

Middle

The poet has used little sound patters. For example he has only used rhyme twice. 'O the unrivalled stench of branded skin, as you slipped your thumb and middle finger in.' and 'don't believe me please if I say that was just my butterfingered way.' I believe that the poet has used rhyme at these two parts to make them stand out more, as these are two very important parts of the poem, the branding of the girls skin, and the apology at the end. The poet has not used any rhythm, alliteration, long and short vowels or onomatopoeia, and I think this is to make the poem more unusual and odd, to create an irregular description of an irregular love. In this untitled poem by Simon Armitage the language used is very modern, for example it describes a chemistry laboratory with a 'Bunsen burner', this is not the kind of language that would be used in an old-fashioned poem. The language in this poem is also very informal and simple, we can tell that the language is simple because every word is very easy to understand. The poem uses both words with one syllable and words with many syllables to help add to the irregular love. The language used in this poem also very descriptive and uses sexual imagery. ' ...as you slipped your thumb and middle finger in.' ...read more.

Conclusion

In this poem every line has exactly ten syllables, this is know as Iambic pentameter or normal speech, as every one speaks. Throughout this poem the poet also uses alliteration of the 'S' sound, which is also known as sibilance. 'And if it snowed and snow covered the drive he took a spade and tossed it to one side.' This gives the impression that his life is continuous and all the things that he did were one after the other, but sometimes he did the wrong thing, and he will be remembered more for those bad things rather than the good. Again, with this poem the language is very similar to that of the untitled poem also by Simon Armitage. The language is very modern, informal and simple, we can tell this because the poet has used words such as 'blubbed' and 'slippered'. These are not real words but are very common slang words of which we all know the meaning. The poet has also used both monosyllabic and polysyllabic words again as before. Both of these poems by Simon Armitage are about feelings, which make it easy for us to identify with. They are both about ordinary people and their regular lives, and their emotions and feelings that everyone can recognise and understand. In both these poems there is very little imagery, there are very few metaphors, no similes and no personification but is very straightforward. The poet has however used quite a few different sound patterns, including rhythm and rhyme. 09/05/2007 - 1 - ...read more.

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