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Harmful Effects of the Agent

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Introduction

Introduction Fast food is one of the world's fastest growing food types and it is continuously expanding. But some of the most rapid growth is occurring in the developing world, where it's radically changing the way people eat. People buy fast food because it's cheap, quick, and heavily promoted. But its benefits can be deceptive. Meals devoured in the car or at our desks are replacing homecooked fare enjoyed with family and friends. Around the world, traditional diets and recipes are yielding to sodas, burgers, and other highly processed and standardized items that are high in fat, sugar, and salt-fuelling a global epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses. Those in less of a hurry are finding alternatives. Fresh organic foods are increasingly popular in Europe, Japan, and the United States. And a "slow food" movement to promote appreciation of food and the cultural experience of shared meals is becoming widespread worldwide. Fast Food Modern commercial fast food is often highly processed and prepared in an industrial fashion, i.e. on a large scale with standard ingredients and standardised cooking and production methods. It is usually prepared and served very rapidly in cartons or bags or in a plastic wrapping, in a fashion which minimizes costs. Menu items are generally made from processed ingredients prepared at a central supply facility and then shipped to individual outlets where they are reheated or cooked (usually by microwave or deep-frying) ...read more.

Middle

Slow Food Convivium (Slow Food branches) organise a variety of events such as tastings, dinners with a particular theme, and visits to places of food and drink interest. Education is an important objective: these convivum either organise initiatives in schools, such as school gardens, or educate people about real food with taste. Conviviums collect information about regional food and drink, e.g. good shops or restaurants, or about food and drink products under threat, and they pass on this information to Slow Food members worldwide. Members receive 'Snail Mail' (the Slow Food UK quarterly newsletter), convivium newsletters and information about forthcoming Slow Food events and activities, as well as the 'Slow Food Companion' a summary of everything that the Slow Food movement does, and other international publications). Collectively, to assist groups of artisan producers, Slow Food convivium have initiatives such as "the Ark of Taste" and the "Presidia" which are designed to rediscover and revive forgotten regional flavours that are in danger of disappearing. Since the international initiative began, more than 750 products from dozens of countries worldwide have been added to the international Ark of Taste. Examples of UK Presidia include artisan Cheddar cheese hand-made in Somerset from unpasteurised milk, Three Counties Perry, and Fal Oysters. Slow Food continues to develop taste education programmes for children and adults, including the new University of Gastronomic Sciences, established in Italy in 2003. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some of these events include Salone del Gusto, Cheese, Slow Fish, Aux Origine du Go�t and A Taste of Slow. Conclusion The natural progression of mankind has been quite phenomenal. On the one hand, we are eating more and more, and more of it is bad stuff. On the other hand, we live longer, which means that if we ate right, we would probablly live to be 130 years or more. One thing is for sure: fast food has gotten faster and slow food is still fighting... When eating out, needless to say, fast food restaurants are often the cheapest option but, unfortunately, not usually the healthiest one. This is the first obstacle to healthy eating: lack of knowledge of the nutritional facts of our favourite items. Consequently, we need to educate ourselves about the food system and the choices we make when eating. Slow food is not only about stopping to eat fast food from one day to the next, but it is more a philosophy of life in which one should take time to enjoy time with family and friends. Everyday can be enriched by doing something "slow" - taking the time to prepare a home-made meal, having lunch with the family, having long discussions over dinner, or even squeezing your own orange juice from the fresh fruit. As simple as it sounds, eating slowly is key to longevity. And eating right goes along with it. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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