The old man and the sea; Book Review.

The old man and the sea; S3 Book Review The old man and the sea by Ernest Hemingway is a short, however, memorable novel that describes a wise old man's struggle to capture the perfect fish. The novel that was based on Gregorio Fuentes, who befriended Hemingway in 1928, was released in 1952 and earned its author a Nobel prize the same year .It is considered by some to be a shortened version of the classic Moby Dick which was released 101 years before. This essay is gong to discuss the different ways the old man's friendship with the boy exists. The first example of their friendship is when the boy suggests that he could fish with the old man again and the old man replies 'No, You're with a lucky boat. Stay with them.' This shows that the old man is more concerned with the boy's well being than his own. The way the story is written just before this shows clearly that the old man and the boy are good friends and would both want to go fishing with each other so this shows clearly that the old man is doing what he thinks is best for the boy. The boy also cares for the old man and this is shown when he thinks 'I must get him another shirt and a jacket for the winter and some sort of shoes and another blanket', this shows that the boy also knows the old man well because he is able to make a quick list of all the things the old man will need. Another example of the boy's

  • Word count: 520
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Which pet to choose-a cat or dog?

McCarty 1 Chrissy McCarty Ms. Owens English 101, Section 013 January 16, 2003 Which pet to choose-a cat or dog? Many households occupy pets. Deciding on a pet can be a difficult decision. The majority of the time people tend to choose either a dog or a cat for their pet. There are many similarities as well as differences between a dog and a cat. However, the differences outnumber the similarities and usually serve as the deciding factor between the two. With either a dog or a cat, there will be a new addition to the family. Much responsibility comes along with this new member. Both depend on their owner entirely for food, shelter, and affection. The dog and the cat require a great deal of time. Both a dog and a cat expect daily attention. Owner loyalty is an advantage to having a dog or cat. The dog and the cat will become good companions with their owner. Both become attached to their owners and vice versa. A dog or cat owner should be prepared for the loss of his or her pet. Both a dog and a cat can become an inconvenience to clean up after. Shedding hair on particular breeds is a hassle with both. Much like a child, they are known to get into things and create unwanted messes. The owner must watch where he or she allows his or her dog or cat to roam. Both the dog and the cat can be inside or outside pets. A future cat or dog owner should take in

  • Word count: 895
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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How does Hemingway introduce the two main characters in The Old Man and the Sea?

How does Hemingway introduce the two main characters in The Old Man and the Sea? "The Old Man and the Sea", one of Ernest Hemingway's most famous novellas, has but two main characters (three if you include the fish) - The Old Man, a fisherman, and "the boy", his companion for his voyage in attempting to catch the mighty fish. Hemingway's famously simple style is no more obvious than in the beginning sentence of the book, introducing The Old Man - "He was an old man who fished alone in a skiff in the Gulf Stream". The man's predicament is introduced, again, with very basic language, and the existence of the boy thrown in seeming almost out of place. The basic scenario is all covered in the first paragraph in very simple language, mostly words of one syllable, and little emotion obvious, apart from the Old Man's lack of success at fishing described as "[making] the boy sad". Then in the second paragraph, we have a burst of descriptive detail and colourful phrases describing the physical appearance of the Old Man - his hands with "deep-creased scars from handling heavy fish on the cords", the scars being "as old as erosions in a fishless desert", wonderfully describing his predicament and the appearance of the scars. We are also told, also in a throw-away manner that the Old Man is covered with "benevolent skin cancer", however, we are told nothing more of it as if it were

  • Word count: 1144
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Theme and narrative in Ernest Hemingway's short story "Hills Like White Elephants"

Kathleen Colligan Aron Reyes English 1B February 5, 2003 Ernest Hemingway's short story "Hills Like White Elephants" contains love, anger, and frustration. In "Hills Like White Elephants" we have two main characters a woman named Jig, and an unnamed American man. The two are apparently lovers. While we don't know how long they have been romantically involved, we do know that Jig is pregnant, and that the man wants her to have an abortion. The story is set in Spain's Ebro Valley at a train station. The train station is near a river looking on barren hills. Because the hills have no vegetation they appear to be white. Their round shape looks somewhat like a white elephant. As our characters sit outside a bar there is an obvious hostility in the air. Jig especially seems very frustrated. This is shown through her sarcastic remarks about drinking absinthe. As the conversation moves on the man speaks of "an awfully simple operation" The man asks the woman to have this operation. He says things like "It's not really an operation at all", and "It's just to let the air in." He tries to tell her "I'll go with you and I'll stay with you all the time. As the conversation progresses we see that Jig's mood becomes more heated. She begins to question things like whether or not the man loves her, and will he still love her the same if she decides to go through with the

  • Word count: 620
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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The Old Man and the Sea is a book by Ernest Hemingway. The author's writing conveys deep messages and focuses on the development of characters who are not always human, but an important part of the story

Heather Quashnie British Literature Mrs. Fegan/ Ms. Mattern 5-05-06 Reflective Essay The Old Man and the Sea is a book by Ernest Hemingway. The author's writing conveys deep messages and focuses on the development of characters who are not always human, but an important part of the story. In this book, Hemingway creates the character of the old man, Santiago, who is a noble man that embodies human striving. There is also a giant fish who is strong and bold, as well as the sea, vast and pervading. The story is great at creating emotion, but it seemed to me to be very drawn out. I would not reccomend this book to people who need instant gratification in their reading, but to those who look for a story that slowly builds up to a great message, then this is the story for them. In the begining of The Old Man and the Sea, you are introduced to Santiago, the old man, and Manolin, a little boy that Santiago has taken under his wing. The story takes place in Havanna, Cuba in an older time than today, but still modern. Santiago is a fisherman that has not caught anything in 84 days. Manolin used to fish with Santiago since he was five, but his parents made him go to another fishing crew when Santiago stopped catching fish. Santiago treats Manolin as if he were his son. This has a great impact on the character of Santiago. It shows Santiago's nature for nurturing. The old man is

  • Word count: 928
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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The End of Something by Ernest Hemingway.

The End of Something by Ernest Hemingway In The End of Something by Ernest Hemingway, a long lasting relation between the two main characters Nick and Marjorie ends, hence the name: The End of Something. The story takes place in what was a thriving lumber set on a river for the easy transportation of the wood. However, the industry dried out, it used to be a bustling town now it is dead. This is a metaphor of the relationship between Nick and Marjorie as their relationship used to be thriving and passionate now it is old and dead. The phrase 'no more lumber' is used in the story, indicative of the fact that there used to be lumber, now it has all gone. In the third paragraph, Hemingway states that 'there was nothing of the mill left except the broken white limestone of its foundations' which is a metaphor of their relationship, showing that it is held together by memories from the past rather than a substance from the present, also the phrase 'twelve feet of dark water' is used which may be representing the areas unknown and unvisited in effect, within their relationship. Marjorie states 'There's our old ruin, Nick' which represents the ruin of the relationship, how it was once a glorified, standing wonder now reduced only to shambles. Throughout their day out fishing, Marjorie is constantly the one trying to make the moves, the one trying to reminisce and revive their

  • Word count: 840
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

A Farewell to Arms The book A Farewell to Arms, written by Ernest Hemingway, is a classic about the love story of a nurse and a war ridden soldier. The story starts as Frederick Henry is serving in the Italian Army. He meets his future love in the hospital that he gets put in for various reasons. I thought that A Farewell to Arms was a good book because of the symbolism, the exciting plot, and the constant moving of the main character. The symbolism in A Farewell to Arms is very much apparent. Ernest Hemingway has always been one who is big on the symbolism of night as being bad. To the main character in Hemingway's novels, nights have always been a sign of death, or something negative to happen. Another one of the symbolisms in A Farewell to Arms is when Henry tries to escape from the Italian army by jumping off one of the ships the army was traveling on and running away from the army. This symbolism was the water that he jumped into was a symbolism of the new, clean life that he was going to live from now on. At this time, Henry goes off and finds his wife to be. The plot in A Farewell to Arms was always active. They were never staying in one place too long. It had a very good story line, which was a love story that ended up in a tragedy. The main character's wife got pregnant and she was off to have her baby when problems started

  • Word count: 529
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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A biography of Ernest Hemingway.

A biography of Ernest Hemingway Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois, the 21st of July of 1899. Hemingway is known to be one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. He has written more than one hundred short fiction stories, many of them to be well known around the world. Some of these short stories had just as powerful an impact as his novels. As a young man, Hemingway left from his hometown to Europe, where he worked for the Red Cross during World War I. His time spent there inspired him to write some of his most famous novels. Most of which spoke of the horrors of the war (Benson xi). Hemingway's short stories, "Soldier's Home" and "Another Country" are used to show the damaging psychological and physical effects of World War I. Hemingway knew first hand the horrors of war. In May of 1918, Hemingway became an honorary second lieutenant in the Red Cross, but could not join the army because he had a defective left eye. Hemingway first went to Paris, and soon after receiving new orders he traveled to Milan, Italy. The day he arrived, an ammunition factory exploded and he had to carry mutilated bodies and body parts to a makeshift morgue. This was definitely a most terrifying moment for the young Hemingway. After being seriously injured weeks later, Hemingway found himself recovering at a hospital in Milan. After his stay at the American

  • Word count: 1625
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Ernest Hemingway's "Soldier's Home"

Ernest Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" By Jimmy Jackson A person's return from war is always a frustrating experience. Facing the normalcy of everyday life while the memories of the gruesome struggles still rage inside a person's mind can wreak emotional havoc on a person's well being. The situation becomes much more dire when the environment he is coming home to tries to push him towards the routine of day-to-day living without letting him adjust gradually. This situation is all too real in Ernest Hemingway's "Soldier's Home" (World). The main character of the story, Harold Krebs, has just returned home from a two-year stint in war-torn Germany. Through his brief tale of life, back at home in Oklahoma, one can clearly see a man struggling to find his place in a difficult world. His family, like so many others, tries to help him get on with life without dealing with what he has just gone through. His town seems to be a completely different place to Harold, although it seems to be the ex-soldier himself who has changed so much. Perhaps the most difficult hurdle to cross is the fact that there is no one Harold can comfortably share his feelings with; without that, his growth as a person will be limited severely. Because of the pressures exerted upon this character, both externally and those self inflicted, the struggle to return to normalcy can be just as difficult as

  • Word count: 1541
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Hemingway's graphic portrait of the lost and wounded post-World War I generation presented in The Sun Also Rises.

Beneath Hemingway's graphic portrait of the lost and wounded post-World War I generation presented in The Sun Also Rises, a blatant anti-Semitic intent emerges. Whether Hemingway was merely a mouthpiece for the intolerant views of his contemporaries or allowed his personal prejudice to seep into the story line can not be ascertained, yet one of the main figures in The Sun Also Rises is consistently assaulted for his Judaic heritage. Robert Cohn's scornful introduction occurs in the first few pages of the novel. The narrator, Jake Barnes, constructs a stereotypical image of Cohn, including a disfigured nose, a bought editorial byline in a magazine he helped finance, and a lackluster relationship, in which Cohn unwittingly succumbs to girlfriend Frances' dominion. This contemptuous description correlates with the standard Jewish stereotype as presented by Edgar Rosenberg: The stereotype of the Jew is that of a fairly thoroughgoing materialist, a physical coward, an opportunist in money matters; secretive in his living habits, servile in his relations with Christians, whom he abominated,...an outlandish nose, an unpleasant odor, and a speech impediment also. He was a literalist...hardly qualified for tragedy. (56) Hemingway, via Jake Barnes, methodically illustrates each aforementioned attribute. For instance, Cohn's stinginess is clearly evident as he entreats Jake to buy

  • Word count: 1042
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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